Tip: The Vanilla Ice Rule of Content Marketing

by Jason Keath on Oct 07, 2014

Social Fresh TipsI call this week’s tip “the Vanilla Ice rule.”

At the next Social Fresh Conference, later this month in San Diego, I am going to give a presentation on this and something I call content envy, but I wanted to give you a quick preview first.

Content envy is the pressure we all put on our businesses to publish a ton of content every day, to a ton of social networks, at a very high quality. One of the things that drives this are the content wealthy brands out there that CAN do this. Like Oreo, Coca-Cola, etc. We see how much great content they produce and we naturally want to keep up with the Jones.

99% of businesses simply do not have the resources or experience to pull it off. And there is no shame in that.

Instead, businesses should be spending MORE of our content marketing and social media hours on LESS content.

Back to Vanilla Ice.

The Vanilla Ice rule says you should be focusing 80% of your content/social marketing time on creating and promoting one big hit. A one hit wonder if you will (his was accidental, yours will be on purpose). This is one high intensity piece of content that should have a strong business strategy behind it.

For Social Fresh, our big hit is the Social Fresh Conference. We work tirelessly to bring together the smartest people in social media twice a year. And then we promote the content from our conference for 6 months.

social fresh conference sessions on youtube

For your business, maybe your big hit is a 50 page ebook or industry report. Maybe it is an event or a weekly podcast. Or maybe it is a Q&A video series.

Pick one big piece of content and make it great. Then tease, re-purpose, excerpt, and reference that main piece of content everywhere.

If your business is large, has a big marketing team, or has been using content marketing for a while, then you can apply this methodology per content marketer or per team. And if you run a small business, you should consider focusing on one big hit per year or per quarter.

More time, on less content.

Post Author

CEO and founder of Social Fresh, the social media education company. Jason is a social media consultant, a social media speaker and industry analyst. He consults with corporations and agencies on social media strategy, building community, and influencer...

  • Paul Sokol

    Excellent point Jason! By focusing efforts on the one big thing at the moment, it should make all associated promotion much more effective.

    Also, thanks for pointing out re-purposing too. We are the experts in our respective domains and the delivery mechanism is psuedo-arbitrary. Meaning, you can pack up the same info in an eBook, webinar, series of blog posts, etc. If you can use that re-purposing to drive back to the one big thing, bonus!

  • Agreed, well said Paul. I think we put so much pressure on our businesses to be everywhere all the time with new stuff, that we leave a lot on the table for the pieces that can really do the most for our business. I’m trying to honestly hit my customers over the head with stuff more often. =)

  • Mark @sfcpdx

    I have to agree Jason. I have been making the transition slowly and the change is showing good results. If you can create dynamic, benefit rich content and write pithy one liner headlines you’re golden. Both are difficult and the dearth of truly good writers pushing quality content is an opportunity for those who can write well but haven’t as yet. ROI will bear this out and will be the reward. #hiregoodwriters
    Slàinte. Mark @sfcpdx

  • FYI…I’m going to totally disagree with you on this at Social Fresh (for the most part at least). ;) No echo chamber here.

  • Oh, I know. But, you haven’t seen my whole talk on this one, but I hear you. I’ve seen your talk.

    Now you just need a better name for yours to keep up.

  • treb072410

    Another great post Jason, thanks for sharing great tip..

  • intouchcrm

    Great post Jason! By focussing at 1 piece of content at a time, you are much more likely to create something truly special, unique and helpful.

  • Wow, that Vanilla Ice reference was a real stretch. Is he trending this week, or something..?

    I sincerely thought your Vanilla Ice Rule of Content Marketing was going to be “Collaborate and Listen.” Because that’s good advice that actually comes from, y’know, Vanilla Ice. ;-)